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Course Information
Course Unit Title : Micro and Nano Tribology
Course Unit Code : 01IMM5109
Type of Course Unit : Optional
Level of Course Unit : Second Cycle
Year of Study : Preb
Semester : 255.Semester
Number of ECTS Credits Allocated : 6,00
Name of Lecturer(s) : ---
Course Assistants :
Learning Outcomes of The Course Unit : Tribology, micro-and nano-tribology to learn the concepts and technology
Mode of Delivery : Face-To-Face
Prerequisities and Co-requisities Courses : Unavailable
Recommended Optional Programme Components : Unavailable
Course Contents : tribology, micro-and nano-tribology fundamentals, measurement technologies, evaluation techniques
Languages of Instruction : Turkish
Course Goals : the creation of the information forming the micro and nano tribology
Course Aims : Micro-and nano-technologies to gain learning skills
WorkPlacement   work placement
Recommended or Required Reading
Textbook : ders notu
Additional Resources : Andras Z. Szeri, Fluid Film Lubrication, Cambridge University Press, 2011
E. Richard Booser, CRC Handbook of Lubrication: Theory and design, CRC Press, 1983
Material Sharing
Documents : Andras Z. Szeri, Fluid Film Lubrication, Cambridge University Press, 2011
E. Richard Booser, CRC Handbook of Lubrication: Theory and design, CRC Press, 1983
Assignments : homework
Exams : mid term exam and final exam
Additional Material : mid term exam and final exam
Planned Learning Activities and Teaching Methods
Lectures, Practical Courses, Presentation, Seminar, Project, Laboratory Applications (if necessary)
ECTS / Table Of Workload (Number of ECTS credits allocated)
Student workload surveys utilized to determine ECTS credits.
Activity :
Number Duration Total  
Course Duration (Excluding Exam Week) :
14 3 42  
Time Of Studying Out Of Class :
14 1 14  
Homeworks :
2 40 80  
Presentation :
0 0 0  
Project :
0 0 0  
Lab Study :
0 0 0  
Field Study :
0 0 0  
Visas :
1 20 20  
Finals :
1 20 20  
Workload Hour (30) :
30  
Total Work Charge / Hour :
176  
Course's ECTS Credit :
6      
Assessment Methods and Criteria
Studies During Halfterm :
Number Co-Effient
Visa :
0 100
Quiz :
0 0
Homework :
0 0
Attendance :
0 0
Application :
0 0
Lab :
0 0
Project :
0 0
Workshop :
0 0
Seminary :
0 0
Field study :
0 0
   
TOTAL :
100
The ratio of the term to success :
40
The ratio of final to success :
60
TOTAL :
100
Weekly Detailed Course Content
Week Topics  
1 the history of macrotribology and micro/nanotribology and their industrial significance. describe various measurement techniques used in micro/nanotribological studies, then present the examples of magnetic storage devices and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) where micro/nanotribological tools and techniques are essential for interfacial studies. Why nanotribological studies are important in magnetic storage devices, MEMS, and other microcomponents.
 
2 AFM Instrumentation and Tips
The performance of AFMs and the quality of AFM images greatly depend on the instruments available
and the sensors (tips) in use. To utilize a microscope to its fullest, it is necessary to know how it works
and where its strong points and its weaknesses are. This chapter describes the instrumentation of force
detection, of cantilevers, and of the instruments themselves.
 
3 Surface Physics in Tribology
Students will approach this problem in steps, first considering the fundamental idea of a surface and next recognizing its atomic character and the expectations of a ball model of the atomic structures present, viewed as a terminated bulk. They will then consider a more realistic description of a relaxed surface and then consider how the class of surface, i.e., metal, semiconductor, or insulator affects these considerations. Finally, presents what is expected when a pure material is alloyed, as well as the effects of adsorbates.
 
4 Characterization and Modeling of Surface Roughness and Contact Mechanics
This week ; explains the framework to include interfacial effects over a whole range of length scales, thus forming a link between nanometer-scale phenomena and macroscopically observable friction and wear. The key is in the size and spatial distributions, which depend not only on the roughness but also on the contact mechanics of surfaces.
Some general relations for the size distributions of contact spots are developed that can form the foundations for theories of friction and wear.
 
5 Surface Forces and Adhesion
The goal of this week is to familiarize, on a conceptual basis, with the forces acting
between asperities, or between an asperity and a flat surface.
 
6 Friction on an Atomic Scale
This week goals, a better understanding of friction and wear could save an enormous amount of energy and money, which would be positive for economy and ecology. On the other hand, friction is not only negative, since it is fundamental for basic technological applications: brakes as well as screws are based on friction
 
7 Microscratching/Microwear Nanofabrication/Nanomachining, and Nano/picoindentation Using Atomic Force Microscopy. This week aims an overview of microscratching/microwear, nanofabrication/nanomachining,
and nano/picoindentation using the atomic force microscope (AFM) and related instrumentation.
 
8 This week aim; explains an overview of lubrication studies of polar and nonpolar lubricants and Langmuir? Blodgett and chemically grafted films, using atomic force/friction force microscopy.
 
9 Surface Forces and Microrheology of Molecularly Thin Liquid Films
In this week; the most important types of surface forces are described and the relevant equations for the force laws given. A number of attractive and repulsive forces operate between surfaces and particles. Some of these occur only in vacuum, for example, attractive van der Waals and repulsive hard-core interactions. Others can arise only when the interacting surfaces are separated by another condensed phase, which is usually a liquid medium. The most common types of surface forces and their main characteristics.
 
10 Nanomechanical Properties of Solid Surfaces and Thin Films
In this week, review various prototype and commercial nanoindentation hardness test
apparatuses and associated scratch capabilities for measurements of mechanical properties of surface layers of bulk materials and extremely thin films (submicron in thickness). A commercial depth-sensing nanohardness test apparatus will be described in detail followed by data analysis and use of nanohardness apparatuses for determination of various mechanical properties of interest.
 
11 Micro/Nanotribology and Micro/Nanomechanics of Magnetic Storage Devices
In this week, includes the state of the art of micro/nanotribology of magnetic storage devices
including surface roughness, friction, adhesion, scratching, wear, indentation, transfer of material detection, and lubrication.
 
12 Mechanical Properties of Materials in Microstructure Technology
The development of microcomponents or microdevices, known as microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).
 
13 Micro/Nanotribology and Micro/Nanomechanics of MEMS Devices
In this week aim, explain the state of the art of micro/nanotribology of magnetic storage devices
including surface roughness, friction, adhesion, scratching, wear, indentation, transfer of material detection, and lubrication.
 
14 Atomic-Scale Simulation of Tribological and Related Phenomena

Understanding and ultimately controlling friction and wear have long been recognized as important to
many areas of technology. this week aim; explains a compromise between analytic models and experiment.
 
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